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Amazon King Jeff Bezos Set to Challenge Ticketmaster’s Rule

One of the world's largest online retailers is reportedly getting into the lucrative US ticketing business.

Patrick Greenby Patrick Green
Photo: Amanda Edwards (Getty Images)

Ticketmaster is one of the most hated companies in America. As much as we all complain about the ticket juggernaut’s exorbitant service charges, archaic ticket platform, and monopoly-like control — Ticketmaster is a necessary evil if you want to see your favorite band, sports team or entertainer perform live.

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Iconic artists (Rolling Stones, Pearl Jam, Louis C.K.) and upstart indie competitors (Ticketyfly, Tikly) have tried to challenge Ticketmaster’s iron rule and all the ticket giant did was was get bigger and more powerful, making deals with venue powerhouse AEG and merging with their biggest rival Live Nation.

Now, perhaps Ticketmaster has finally met their match as Amazon is reportedly ready to jump into the $5 billion dollar ticketing industry fray. 

Reuters is reporting that Amazon, one of the world’s largest online retailers, is ready to make a power move that will challenge Ticketmaster’s 30-plus year rule.

Of course, that will be easier said than done as Ticketmaster might be hated by artists and fans, but has longtime relationships with the operators of major U.S. sports stadiums, arenas, concert halls and other venues.

However, the Seattle-based company has already disrupted other business models with its superior technology and massive customer base that challenges traditional industry norms like retailers, bookstores, supermarkets, etc.

Amazon has already had success with ticketing in Britain, where it has been selling seats to West End shows since 2015, even outselling Ticketmaster for some events, according to one of the sources, who owns venues in that country. 

Although, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos could be our knight in shining bald head, his challenge to the Ticketmaster throne is not purely for altruistic reasons, but yet another way to steer potential customers to his Amazon Prime shopping club.