Design //

Cadillac Rides into Munich with ‘Letters to Andy Warhol’

Celebrating its unique relationship with the famous artist, Cadillac brought the international exhibit "Letters to Andy Warhol" to Munich.

John Scott Lewinskiby John Scott Lewinski

The match of an American luxury automaker and the world’s most famous pop artist might seem an unusual one. But, Cadillac and Andy Warhol go way back.

Now, fresh off its successful stay in Manhattan’s Cadillac House, the historic Letters to Andy Warhol exhibit headed to a new space in Munich. For the next six weeks, the iconic car brand will show off its 2017 models besides an exploration of correspondence between Warhol and the world.

Also: BMW Art Car by John Baldessari Debuts at Art Basel, Miami

The relationship of Warhol and Cadillac reaches back decades. Warhol’s Pop Art classics are famous for idealizing and exploring American brands from Campbell’s Soup to Marilyn Monroe. Cadillac was his automobile of choice and s Bazaar, and he illustrated a 1958 Cadillac Coupe de Ville before forging a graphite on sketchbook exploration of a second Caddy in 1962. Warhol’s Seven Cadillacs features silkscreen images of a 1963 Cadillac Fleetwood Special.

IMG_0177

So, it was a natural enough move for Cadillac to serve as the Official Car of the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburg and to bring the new letters exhibit out into the world. With the exception of displaying versions of Warhol’s Cadillac art, the correspondence exhibit features communication from the artist to multiple entities from throughout his career. Some are famous, like The Rolling Stones and Yves St. Laurent. Other show the mundane tasks of dealing with galleries and city governments.

IMG_0175

Most of the documents and other achieved items came from the Warhol Museum which worked closely with Cadillac to curate the exhibit. The same show made successful stops in Miami and Los Angeles. Now that Letters to Andy Warhol moved on from its Soho home and settled in Cadillac House Munich, it will remain on display within the grounds of the Deutsches Museum for three additional weeks.