Design //

Take a Virtual Reality Tour of the Playboy Mansion

Get a peak of Playboy publisher Hugh Hefner's notorious digs in 360.

Erica Riveraby Erica Rivera

If you’ve always dreamed of touring the Playboy Mansion, here’s your chance. In honor of Playboy‘s May/June 2017 Playmate of the Year issue, the magazine has partnered with virtual reality and 360 content provider Inception to give fans a video tour of the legendary digs of publishing mogul (and eternal bad boy) Hugh Hefner. Watch on computer, phone, or headset as Playboy’s chief creative officer Cooper Hefner guides you through never-before-seen parts of the luxurious estate that the Hefner family and dozens of bunnies have called home.

Cooper Hefner greets viewers in what appears to be the library, then kicks off the tour in the Great Hall, where the Beatles’ John Lennon once put out a cigarette on a piece of art by Matisse. (It, and a neighboring Dalí painting are now framed behind glass to prevent such travesties.) A portrait of Hugh Hefner, made with Jack Daniels, baby oil, and editorial pieces adorns a wall in the dining room. The living-cum-movie room is the next stop on the tour, where Cooper Hefner discusses the movie viewing schedule of the house and shows off his father’s popcorn blanket.

Also: Playboy Is Back To Publishing Nudes Again!

“My dad likes to keep everything as is,” Cooper Hefner says in the Med Room. “When anything’s been changed out, it has been changed out to something that looks exactly like the one before.” Though Coop will talk your ear off about a five-dollar bill from Esquire magazine on the wall of the Game Room, the most eye-catching attraction here is the gaggle of girls in body-con dresses at the pool table. Then it’s on to the Van Room, a replica of the rear of a 1970s van, complete with mirrors on the ceiling and a mattress beneath the floor. No exposition needed.

Overall, the decor of the Playboy mansion isn’t all that impressive; it’s outdated, dark, and almost oppressive in its style and color schemes. The art collection is certainly ogle-worthy. And, oh, if these walls could talk…